tessmudge

Resources for my first podcast on second hand fashion

In Honours blog on July 23, 2009 at 3:18 am

Second hand clothes resources:

http://www.communityguide.com.au/community.cfm?/australia/cat/clothingfashion/recycledclothing/

http://www.planetark.org/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/34069/story.htm

“Every dollar Australians spend on new clothes as gifts consumes 20 litres (four gallons) of water and requires 3.4 square metres (37 sq feet) of land in the manufacturing process, it said.

Last Christmas, Australians spent A$1.5 billion (US$1.1 billion) on clothes, which required more than half a million hectares (1.2 million acres) of land to produce, it said.

Water that would approximately fill 42,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools was used in the production of Christmas drinks last December — most was used to grow barley for beer and grapes for wine.”

http://www.carouselrecycle.websyte.com.au/

Whether you’re looking for a hat for the Spring Carnival Races or a tidy evening outfit, Carousel Recycle at 798a Burke Rd in Camberwell gives you a range of options.”

http://melb-opshopping.blogspot.com/2009/05/jigsaw-puzzles-anyone.html

“I OP therefore I am”

http://www.acfonline.org.au/custom_greenhome/calculator.asp?section_id=86

Part of the eway to calculate your eco footprint  depends on how many clothes you buy.

Producing clothes has a significant environmental impact, using much water, energy and land. The amount of water used in the production and transport of clothes bought by an average Australian household each year is 150,000 litres – buying second hand clothes or repairing old clothes could save much of this water. Cotton in particular requires a lot of water and often also uses a lot of chemicals. On average worldwide, every new T-shirt made takes about 1.5 kilograms of chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) to produce.”

http://www.acfonline.org.au/default.asp?section_id=93

“After food, clothing purchases alone have the second highest environmental impact (in terms of land disturbance, energy and water use) of all our consumption activities. The amount of water used in the production and transport of clothes bought by an average Australian household each year is 150,000 litres.

Even products you might think are environmentally neutral, like your favourite band’s latest CD, will often require significant resources to produce. Consider the energy and embodied water used in the creation of the disc, its booklet and packaging, how the CD was transported to the shop and how you travelled to buy it.

Next time you go shopping ask yourself a few questions before making a purchase. For example, how far has this product travelled to reach the shelf? How long will this product last? Is there a better alternative, or do I even need it at all?”

http://www.acfonline.org.au/articles/news.asp?news_id=1921

“Clothing: 3.4% of overall household greenhouse gas emissions”

“One cotton t-shirt requires 2000 litres of water”

http://www.acfonline.org.au/articles/news.asp?news_id=171

“For every new t-shirt that you buy roughly 1.5 kilograms of chemicals (pesticides and fertilisers) have been used.

The amount of water used in the production and transport of clothes bought by an average household each year is 150,000 litres – buying second hand clothes or repairing old clothes could save much of this water.”

http://www.gogreeneraustralia.com/blog/index.php/2009/04/06/preloved-clothes-after-a-fashion/

“By going secondhand and pre-loved, you’re:

  • reducing the amount of time, energy and resources spent on the construction, shipping and sales of new clothes
  • reusing items that aren’t ready to be thrown out yet
  • recycling fashion, in the best tradition of retro-chic!”
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